South Sudan: Use Peace Deal Extension for Reforms

0
Humanitarian Situation - South Sudan
Security details kept a close watch on the crowds during official South Sudan independence day ceremonies held in the new country's capital of Juba.

South Sudanese leaders should address chronic insecurity, rights abuses, and the worsening humanitarian situation, Human Rights Watch said today. The authorities should address the following human rights violations and other issues.

JUBA AUGUST 18: South Sudanese leaders should address chronic insecurity, rights abuses, and the worsening humanitarian situation during the country’s extended transition period, Human Rights Watch said today.

Regional and international partners should enhance pressure and leverage to ensure that institutional reforms are completed, the rule of law is restored, and that there is significant progress on protecting human rights.

On August 4, 2022, parties to the September 2018 peace deal agreed to extend it for another 24 months starting in February 2023, when the original deal is expected to expire. President Salva Kiir, who signed the extension alongside four other political groups, said that the extension will allow for unification of the armed forces, creation of a new constitution, and time to prepare for elections to avoid a return to war.

“The last four-and-a-half years in South Sudan have been characterized by repression, violence against civilians, and attacks that have undermined efforts to complete the transition,” said Nyagoah Tut Pur, South Sudan researcher at Human Rights Watch.

The extension takes place against a backdrop of widespread insecurity and a heavy climate of repression. Between the localized and intercommunal conflicts in some parts of the country, floods, chronic underdevelopment, and the impact of Covid-19, South Sudan residents face a dire humanitarian situation, with 60 percent of the population facing food insecurity.

During the extended transition, the authorities should address the following human rights violations and other issues previously proposed by Human Rights Watch and partners.

Image: Steve Evans

Social Jobs