What’s Behind Rising Tribal Tensions In Sudan?

0

Over the past week, Sudan has seen some of its worst tribal violence in years. At least 79 people have been killed. Hausa protesters took to the streets of a number of cities in Sudan on Tuesday. Some of those protesters called for an end to the repression of the Hausa people.

KHARTOUM JULY 20: Over the past week, Sudan has seen some of its worst tribal violence in years. At least 79 people have been killed in Blue Nile state. Fighting between the Berti and Hausa tribes is being blamed on issues including long-running tribal disputes, land access, and tensions with leaders in the capital Khartoum. It has triggered protests led by Hausa members in neighbouring states.

Has Sudan’s military takeover worsened relations between tribes?

Blue Nile is one of the eighteen states of the Republic of the Sudan. It was established by presidential decree in 1992 and is named after the Blue Nile River. The region is host to around forty different ethnic groups. Its economic activity is based on agriculture and livestock and increasing mineral exploitation.

Hausa protesters took to the streets of a number of cities in Sudan on Tuesday, following a spate of clashes in the country’s southern Blue Nile state. Coup forces used tear gas to disperse those who had gathered in the capital. Some of those who protested on Tuesday in Khartoum called for an end to what they called the repression of the Hausa people.

The political forces of the Sudanese revolution issued a joint statement condemning the violence in the Blue Nile State. From their statement, one can read the following: “Overthrowing the coup is the only way to end this situation of security flow and statehood and tribal facades that create problems and conflicts among them to provide justifications and justifications for the continuation of military rule”.

Social Jobs