Sudan: Voices Of Protesters Should Be Heard

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Mohamed Osman of Human Rights Watch issued a commentary today. Protesters have faced the military’s organized repression, including the use of lethal force, and widespread unlawful detentions. The international community should stand in solidarity with the Sudanese people.

KHARTOUM June 28: Mohamed Osman of Human Rights Watch issued a commentary today regarding the protests in Sudan. In his commentary he writes, among other things:

Sudan’s tenacious street protesters and other supporters of the social movement have continued to take to the streets and find ways to express their resistance to the country’s October 2021 military coup.

They’ve faced the military’s organized repression, including the use of lethal force, and widespread unlawful detentions. For over seven months Sudanese have lived under a military-imposed state of emergency, which, in addition to the existing impunity for the security forces, was used to justify abuses.

Almost eight months after the coup, the international response remains insufficient. Concerned governments and donors should make clear that they are willing to stand with Sudanese not only in words but in actions and get behind calls for accountability, justice, and security sector reform. This means listening to the voices of this vibrant movement, addressing their key demands on building a rights-respecting, civilian rule, and not jettisoning justice in favor of political expediency.

Large protests are planned for June 30, the anniversary of al-Bashir’s 1989 military coup. They will also mark the three-year anniversary of the huge marches that followed the military’s assumption of power when al-Bashir was ousted, and the deadly dispersal of the June 3, 2019 sit-in, when at least 120 people were killed.

The international community should stand in solidarity with the Sudanese people. They should make clear to the junta that use of violence against peaceful protestors will not be tolerated and set out clear consequences for those responsible for the repression.

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