Sudan’s Political Crisis

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Talks to get Sudan back on track to civilian rule were dealt another blow this week after the AU called the negotiations dishonest. Reports in SUNA indicated that the African Union had withdrawn from the Trilateral Mechanism. The African Union firmly denied this claim.

KHARTOUM June 23: In 2019, after months of unrest, Omar al Bashir was forced to step down. The Sudanese president was one of the world’s longest ruling dictators. So when he fell, Sudan finally had a chance at democracy. But after decades of autocratic rule, a transition wouldn’t be easy, and over the past three years there have been a number of setbacks. Talks to get the country back on track to civilian rule were dealt another blow this week after the African Union called the negotiations dishonest.

Guests

Hamid Khalafallah
Sudanese Activist

Rabie Abdul Atti Obeid
Former Senior Official with Sudan’s National Congress Party

Cameron Hudson
Senior Fellow at Atlantic Council’s Africa Center

Reports in SUNA have indicated that the African Union had withdrawn from the Trilateral Mechanism. African Union has since denied SUNA’s information, saying they were a result of “inaccurate interpretations of the speech of the Special Representative of the AU”, Mohamed Belaiche.

Mohamed Belaiche was reported to have said, during a meeting with the coalition in Khartoum, that the AU could not “participate in a path that is not followed by transparency, honesty and non-exclusion.”

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