UN Peacekeeping Mission In South Sudan Extended

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The UN Security Council extended the mandate for the UN peacekeeping force in South Sudan. The resolution sets the end of the missions mandate on March 15th, 2023. China’s deputy UN ambassador, Bing, criticized the US for pushing “for inclusion of many human rights-related texts” – but that’s just what one can expect from China.

The UN Security Council extended the mandate for the 19,000-strong UN peacekeeping force in South Sudan for a year. The resolution was adopted by a vote of 13-0, with Russia and China abstaining, both calling the measure unbalanced for focusing too much on human rights in the east African nation.

China’s deputy UN ambassador, Dai Dai Bing, criticized the United States for pushing “for inclusion of many human rights-related texts, resulting in a very unbalanced draft resolution.” But this was just to be expected.

In countries like China and Russia, Human Rights are not a factor. These countries are governed by like-minded sociopaths. Human life has no value in these countries.

The resolution sets the end of the missions mandate on March 15th, 2023.

South Sudan, officially known as the Republic of South Sudan, is a landlocked country in east/central Africa. Its population was estimated as 12,778,250 in 2019. Juba is the capital and largest city.

It gained independence from Sudan in 2011, making it the most recent sovereign state or country with widespread recognition as of 2022.

The United Nations has peacekeepers in the country as part of the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS). Numerous ceasefires were mediated by the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) between the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM) and SPLM – in opposition and were subsequently broken.

New Report: South Sudan Human Rights Monitor

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