HRW: Human Rights In Sudan

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Human Rights Watch

Human Rights Watch Report 2022 is released. The annual review of human rights trends around the globe, reviews developments in more than 100 countries. On October, the military leaders of the transitional government carried out a coup. And began murdering unarmed civilians.

Human Rights Watch: World Report 2022 is released. Human Rights Watch’s 32nd annual review of human rights trends around the globe, reviews developments in more than 100 countries.

Below you can read some of the conclusions this prestigious organization has made. We also attach a link to the report, so you can read it in its entirety.

The second year of Sudan’s democratic transition has been marred by political instability that slowed the pace of rights and rule of law reforms, and a dire economic situation that compounded public discontent.

On September 21, authorities announced that a coup attempt had been quashed in Khartoum, and the prime minister said officers affiliated with former President Omar al-Bashir’s regime were involved.

Government officials reaffirmed their previously expressed commitment to cooperate with the International Criminal Court (ICC) and the Cabinet of Ministers agreed in June to hand over suspects to the court.

On October 25, the military leaders of the transitional government carried out a coup, arresting civilian officials and dissolving the transitional government. Protesters took to the streets rejecting the coup, and security forces responded violently with lethal force, detaining protesters and political leaders, as well cutting off internet for almost 3 weeks.

In response to anti-coup protests, Security forces have repeatedly used excessive force, including lethal force, against demonstrators. Forty-two people were killed in Khartoum between October 25 and November 21 including five children and one woman. Sixteen people were shot dead on November 17, 2021, alone, including a woman and a child, the deadliest response to date.

Despite ongoing calls for justice for serious crimes, accountability for atrocities was limited.

According to the office of the attorney-general, eight cases involving protester killings have been recommended to move to courts this year. At time of writing, there were two ongoing criminal trials in Khartoum and three in Atbara, River Nile State, in which members of the security forces are facing charges of murder and crimes against humanity.

Moreover, I think al-Burhan has lost all dignity, honor and identity.
He is an enemy of God, the Sudanese, and the humanity.

Human Rights Watch – World Report 2022

Image: Hind Mekki

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