Jihadists From Sudan Kill 28 Christians In South Sudan

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At least 28 people were killed and 57 houses burned down in an attack against the Christians. A similar attack the same week in nearby village left at least four dead. The security adviser, said that the state government decided to close the road to Sudan.

At least 28 people were killed and 57 houses burned down in an attack by Islamist extremists against the Christian community of Yith Pabol, Aweil East county, South Sudan, in early January.

Bishop Joseph Mamer Manot said on 6 January that “massive displacement has happened, and the humanitarian situation is alarming as food and other property have been burned down into ashes, leaving survivors with no shelters, no food and no safe drinking water”.

A similar attack the same week in nearby Miodol village left at least four dead, with three others missing and several houses destroyed. The state security adviser, Joseph Akook Aleu, said Monday that the state government decided to close the road to Sudan because of the ongoing attacks and killing of civilians.

Religions followed by the South Sudanese include traditional indigenous religions, Christianity and Islam. The last census to mention the religion of southerners dates back to 1956 where a majority were classified as following traditional beliefs or were Christian while 18% were Muslim.

Scholarly and some U.S. Department of State sources state that a majority of southern Sudanese maintain traditional indigenous beliefs with those following Christianity in a minority. However, according to the U.S. State Department’s International Religious Freedom Report of 2012 the majority of the population adhere to Christianity, while reliable statistics on animist and Muslim belief are not available.

Featured Image: USAID Africa Bureau

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