Sudan: Women In Revolt

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Khartoum autumn 2021,The Sudanese capital has been in turmoil since General Burhan ousted the civilian government. Sudanese women rights groups published statements and organised protests demanding civilian rule.

Khartoum, autumn 2021: The Sudanese capital has been in turmoil since General Burhan ousted the civilian government in a coup. Sara, 23, a leftist student, has participated in all the struggles of the Sudanese revolution.

Sudan’s coup on 25 October was both highly anticipated and inevitable. For three months, tension between the civilian and military partners that had ruled Sudan since the 2019 powersharing deal had been intensifying.

The coup was not a surprise. In fact, many groups, including resistance committees, professional unions and youth groups, had been warning for months about early signs of a military takeover.

The protesters on the streets of Sudan’s villages, towns and cities are not just defying Al-Burhan and Hemedti. They are fighting the ghosts of the past, and the old traditions and political practices that are dominating our present.

The young generations leading the revolt have managed to create their own language, their own visions, and their own way of leading. Take Randok, a street language created by the displaced young men from conflict areas, mostly non-Arabic speakers, who found themselves homeless on Khartoum’s streets since the 1990s.

This language has been widely adopted by the younger generation over the last decade and used as a tool to resist the oppression of the former regime by students and artists. During the 2019 revolution it was used to pass coded messages to young protesters.

This widespread adoption of a language of marginalised homeless people affected by war gave rare recognition to parts of Sudan’s population who are usually forgotten. It was also an indication of the deep desire for fundamental change in the country.

Sudanese women’s rights groups published statements and organised protests demanding civilian rule and condemning the military’s attempts to take power.

This article is published under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International licence.
Link to original article: Open Democracy
Featured Image: Hind Mekki

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