The 2023 conflict in Sudan has led to the damage and destruction of the banking infrastructure in Khartoum. Both the Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF) and Rapid Support Forces (RSF) have particularly targeted banks across the country. Many of the people who fled the conflict in Khartoum left with only the cash they had on hand.

KHARTOUM AUGUST 12: The 2023 conflict in Sudan has led to the damage and destruction of the banking infrastructure in Khartoum, the epicentre of fighting and where banking operators are mainly based. This has significantly affected cash access across the country.

Both the Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF) and Rapid Support Forces (RSF) have particularly targeted banks across the country to curtail cash access by either party.

Although the online apps of major banking services, such as Bankak (the Bank of Khartoum or BoK app), resumed working in May, the provision of services remains limited and intermittent because of a lack of capacity and resources, as well as disruptions in electricity and network connections.

Online apps, such as Cashi, KhartouMap, and Nidaa, which allow for the person-to-person (P2P) transfer of money outside the Central Bank of Sudan (CBOS) ecosystem, are also providing cash transfer services to a limited extent.

Banks have also limited operation hours to control crowding and manage their limited capacity, affecting people’s access to cash in a time of uncertainty.

Many of the people who fled the conflict in Khartoum left with only the cash they had on hand. Combined with a shortage of supplies and inflation because of conflict-induced disruptions, the lack of cash has affected people’s access to food and other basic services to varying degrees across the country, particularly in conflict zones such as Khartoum.

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