Sudan Sees Spike In Tropical Disease

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Sudan’s public health sector is struggling to effectively diagnose and treat patients with dengue fever. A very recent serious spike in mosquito-borne diseases has underscored the fragility of the health system. Dengue Fever is a mosquito-borne viral infection causing a severe flu-like illness and, sometimes causing a lethal complication.

KHARTOUM FEBRUARY 13: Sudan’s underfunded public health sector is struggling to effectively diagnose or treat patients with dengue fever as significant government spending went to its vast security services.

For many decades, Sudan’s severely underfunded public health sector has struggled hard to effectively diagnose or treat patients while significant government spending went to its vast security services.

A recent serious spike in mosquito-borne diseases — such as dengue fever and malaria — has underscored the fragility of the African country’s health system.

Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral infection causing a severe flu-like illness and, sometimes causing a potentially lethal complication called severe dengue. The incidence of dengue has increased 30-fold over the last 50 years. Up to 50-100 million infections are now estimated to occur annually in over 100 endemic countries, putting almost half of the world’s population at risk.

Dengue is mainly transmitted by a mosquito (Aedes aegypti) and is distributed across all tropical countries. Ae. aegypti and other species such as Ae. albopictus are highly adaptive and their combined distribution can spread dengue higher up north across Europe during summer.

Dengue causes flu-like symptoms and lasts for 2-7 days. Dengue fever usually occurs after an incubation period of 4-10 days after the bite of the infected mosquito.

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